Metabolic syndrome predicts kidney disease

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Having the so-called metabolic syndrome may raise the risk of chronic kidney disease in people with type 2 diabetes, researchers from China report.

Metabolic syndrome refers to a cluster of risk factors for diabetes and heart disease — including abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, low levels of “good” HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides (another type of blood fat). The syndrome is typically diagnosed when a person has three or more of these conditions.

The current study suggests that conventional cardiovascular risk factors are also predictors of kidney trouble, Dr. Peter C. Y. Tong from The Chinese University of Hong Kong noted in comments to Reuters Health. “Hence, physicians should actively assess patients with diabetes for these risk factors and treat them aggressively,” Tong said.

Tong and colleagues looked for ties between metabolic syndrome and its components and kidney disease in more than 5,800 Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes.

They found that the risk of developing chronic kidney disease increased as the number of components of the metabolic syndrome increased.

Patients with four components of the metabolic syndrome had a 1.64-fold increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease, while those with five components had a 2.34-fold increased risk, they report in the journal Diabetes Care.

In a “multivariable” analysis, the presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with a 31 percent increased risk of kidney disease compared with people with no evidence of metabolic syndrome.

Addressing the individual components of the metabolic syndrome will not be enough to reduce the risk of kidney disease, Tong noted. However, a “global risk reduction” of high blood sugar, abdominal obesity, high blood pressure and high blood fats should prevent the deterioration of kidney function, the researcher said.

SOURCE: Diabetes Care, December 2008.

Source

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Related Posts:


NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Regular exercise and a calcium-rich diet could be two ways to help lower the risk of metabolic syndrome, according to a new study. Metabolic syndrome refers to a cluster of risk factors for diabetes and heart disease — including abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, low levels of “good”

Full Post: Exercise, calcium may lower metabolic syndrome risk
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By Martha Kerr NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In people with type 1 diabetes, adequate control of blood sugar over the long haul helps reduce the risk of diabetes-related eye and kidney disease, new data suggest. The findings stem from a look at 1,441 type 1 diabetic patients followed for roughly 9 years as part of the

Full Post: Stable blood sugar curbs diabetes complications
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

LONDON (Reuters) - Adding nuts to a traditional Mediterranean diet rich in fruit and vegetables appears to provide extra health benefits, Spanish researchers said on Monday. A daily serving of mixed nuts helped a group of older people manage their metabolic syndrome, a group of related disorders such as obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and

Full Post: Nuts boost health benefit of Mediterranean diet
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By David Douglas NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - White-coat hypertension is considered harmless in most people, but it appears to increase the risk of microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes, Brazilian researchers report in Diabetes Care. White-coat hypertension refers to the tendency for some patients who normally don’t have high blood pressure to have a

Full Post: “White-coat” hypertension not benign in diabetics
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By David Douglas NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Intensive control of high blood pressure (hypertension) leads to improved pregnancy outcomes in women with type 1 diabetes and kidney disease, Danish researchers report in the journal Diabetes Care. “Diabetic women with kidney involvement have an increased risk of complications in pregnancy leading to preterm delivery,” lead investigator Dr.

Full Post: Blood pressure control key for diabetic pregnancy

Site Navigation

Most Read

Search